Lymphatic System Immunity: Optimization Tips

The Lymphatic System and Immunity: A New Understanding of How to Optimize Immunity

Why is lymphatic system immunity important? It helps facilitate your body’s immune response and eliminate toxic waste.


The lymphatic system is central to facilitating the body’s immune response and removing toxic waste. What wasn’t known until recently is how far the lymphatic system extends into and around the brain. The breakthrough is shocking because scientists had thought that all major parts of the human anatomy had previously been discovered.

This new research has major implications for the understanding of the lymphatic system, its importance, and how people can optimize immunity functions.

What’s the Lymphatic System, and Why Is It Important?

The lymphatic system consists of vessels connecting up to 700 nodes throughout the body. This network helps fight infections by transporting white blood cells and detoxify the body by removing waste and unwanted materials. Lymph fluid runs throughout this network, carrying the white blood cells needed to fight infections.

In addition to the network of vessels, the lymphatic system consists of tissues and organs, the largest of which is the spleen. The spleen plays a big role in detecting attacks on the immune system, creating white blood cells to ward off attacks and filtering our blood. The thymus, also a lymphatic organ, is responsible for training T-cells, an important type of white blood cell, to fight disease.

The most recently discovered part of the lymphatic system is known as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is in the brain and runs through our central nervous system. It’s a way for our body to carry vital fluids into our brain while draining waste and toxins. Studies show that most of the removal and drainage of waste happens during sleep when we’re unconscious and rejuvenating the body.

Another important part of the lymphatic system is villus, a type of vascular membrane in the small intestine that contains lymphatic structures that are vital to absorbing fat and transporting fat-soluble nutrients throughout the body.

How to Optimize the Lymphatic System

The lymph system, unlike the heart, has no pump and therefore needs movement and circulation through manual routines. Regular exercise, inversion training, deep breathing, and drinking lots of water have proven to aid this circulation.

Getting better sleep is absolutely essential to maintaining a healthy lymphatic system, particularly when removing waste from our brain. Optimizing sleep includes good habits like prioritizing when to go to bed, sticking to a schedule, and creating a relaxing environment in your bedroom.

Further, many natural herbs are effective in supporting a healthy lymphatic system. Phyllanthus niruri (Chanca Piedra, Stonebreaker) is a tropical plant from Peru that improves the spleen’s function, as well as balances the production of antibodies. Terminalia chebula is a tree fruit traditionally used to support the health of intestinal villi, and immunity responses in the digestive system. Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi, Holy Basil) is an herb that can help balance production in the thymus.

Health Is a Whole Body Approach

Ultimately, health (and the idea of pursuing health — one of our favorite topics) is a byproduct of a whole body approach. Our bodies are a network of systems. When one system is out of sync, the other systems are necessarily impacted. The pursuit of health requires a combination of nutritious food, restorative sleep, regular exercise, and consistent stress-reduction techniques.

Beyond that, the pursuit of health requires a wellness mindset – a commitment not just to understanding what your body needs but also – and more importantly – to honoring those needs.

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